Frequently Asked Questions

Cataract Surgery

Q: Do I need approval from my insurance company?

A: Most insurance companies require prior authorization for cataract surgery. M/S Surgery Center and the Shammas Eye Medical Center are dedicated to make the process a smooth one for you. Our nurses will fill out all the necessary forms and will obtain authorization from your insurance company. When the authorization is received, we will call you to schedule the surgery at your convenience.

Q: Do I need any special tests before the surgery?

A: Once the permission for your eye surgery is obtained, you will have a special teaching session on what to expect before, during, and after the surgery, and to make sure that all your questions are answered. Family members are welcome to attend.

An ultrasound exam is performed to measure the precise dimensions of the eye and to determine the actual power of the lens implant needed for surgery.

A check-up will be performed in our offices to determine the general condition of health.

Q: Do I have to use antibiotic eye drops?

A: Recent studies have shown that antibiotic eye drops used before the surgery can decrease the incidence of a serious eye infection afterwards. You will begin using eye drops 3 days prior to your surgery. You will resume using the same eye drops to the operated eye after the patch is removed the next day.

Q: How about my regular medications?

A: Before the surgery, you should not eat or drink for at least 8 hours.

You will be instructed on your medications during your teaching session. Normally, on the day of surgery, you can take your heart and blood pressure medications with a sip of water. Insulin or other medications are delayed till after the surgery. We prefer that you stop Aspirin and anticoagulants for three days prior to surgery to avoid excessive bleeding.

In most cases, you can resume taking your medications as usual, once you go home.

Q: Is the surgery painful?

A: The surgery is normally painless and most patients are operated under local anesthesia. The heart, blood pressure, pulse, oxygen saturation and respiration are monitored by the anesthesiologist who administers medications to ensure painless surgery. We usually recommend two Tylenol tablets for any minor discomfort after the surgery.

Q: How long do I keep the eye patch?

A: Before leaving the Surgery Center, you will be given an appointment to see the eye doctor the following day, usually at the same office where you are normally seen. The patch will be removed and the eye will be checked. However, the first week you still need to use the eye shield (without a patch) at night for protection.

Q: Any restrictions after surgery?

A: The first week after surgery, you should avoid doing anything that creates a physical strain. In general, it is no problem if activities are kept in moderation. You can bathe and shower normally but should avoid getting soapy water in the eye. Most regular activities can be resumed after one week.

Also, the operated eye is very sensitive to light. Ultraviolet filtering goggles will be provided to you as a gift from the Shammas Eye Medical Center. We advise you to use them outdoors, especially the first week.

Q: When can I have the second eye done?

A: If the other eye has a cataract and needs surgery, the best time to discuss it with your surgeon will be one week after surgery, once it has been established that the first operated eye is healing well. A new authorization will be needed from your insurance company.

Q: Will I need to wear glasses after surgery?

A: The need to wear glasses after cataract surgery is very much dictated by your choice of implant.

With a standard conventional implant, most patients will need bifocal glasses for distance and reading. However, you can decrease your dependence on glasses after cataract surgery by choosing one of the Premium implants described on our website.

Get The Latest

Macular Degeneration FAQs

Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss in Americans, and it affects up to ten million people. That’s a lot of people who need . . . read more
  • Posted on Nov 15, 2018
  • By:

Floaters: Are They Serious?

You may have been warned about floaters (bright little lines or dots that pan across your vision for a few seconds), especially if you have a . . . read more
  • Posted on Oct 15, 2018
  • By: